Te Marautanga o Aotearoa

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Associate Professor Sally Peters
Winter 201925 Jul 2019

Working together effectively and consistently

Children do not exist in isolation; their lives are embedded in families, communities and societies. Nested within these communities are the schools and early childhood education (ECE) services children attend. When I was a child, my experience was of little interaction between schools and their communities. Looking back, this seems due to the culture of practice within schools, more than the school gates. In the intervening years, writers like Bronfenbrenner1 have drawn our attention to the complex influences of environments – both immediate and more remote –  on development and the value of creating meaningful reciprocal connections between the different groups and settings that children are part of. Today we see attention to the role of communities reflected in our  curriculum documents. “Family and Community/Whānau Tangata” is one of the principles of the early childhood curriculum, Te Whāriki, along with the expectation that each ECE service will use the curriculum “as a basis for weaving with children, parents and whānau its own local curriculum of valued learning, taking into consideration also the aspirations and learning priorities of hapū, iwi and community”. For kura and schools, Te Marautanga notes that for learners to succeed, the school, the home, hapū, iwi and community

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Winter 201830 Jul 2018

Portraits of Tupuna

Schools are finding new ways to integrate arts and science into the curricula, like this Kawerau school and its student-led photography project.

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Winter 201816 Jul 2018

Te Marautanga o Aotearoa

Hita Foster shares her kaupapa of Te Marautanga o Aotearoa, inspiring educators and schools to draw ideas from Te Marautanga o Aotearoa when designing their own curriculum in their areas.

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