Embracing change

Kia ora koutou,

As we emerge from one of the hardest winters in recent times, I’m pleased to share this spring edition of Ako, which imagines a brighter future, exploring how interconnection, innovation and inclusion might get us there.

The large disruption from the last couple of years has naturally brought with it opportunities to rethink or rebuild a more future-focussed
education system. Being forced to work differently is certainly an uncomfortable feeling but at the same time it can be exciting. This is the opportunity that we have ahead of us as educators. What are the lessons that we have learned? And what are the changes in practice that we should continue with? Educators are used to being adaptable, resilient and grappling with that innate feeling to push beyond the status quo. This edition of Ako looks to highlight and celebrate that ambition.

Here you can read about what quality initial teacher education looks like, how education can be more inclusive, and ways that schools are benefitting from following the maramataka. As she steps down from her role as Kaihautū Rangahau Chief Researcher at NZCER Cathy Wylie shares some of her wisdom on how we can learn from each other, and Auckland University Professor Christine Rubie-Davies explains why we need to abandon ability grouping.

With the recent increased flooding and rising seas it seems we have already reached the future, and so we find out how educators are empowering tamariki to take the lead on reducing emissions and adaptation. And finally, we hear from members who have discovered silver linings from COVID-19 and are taking their innovations forward to improve their practices. We hope these stories inspire you to dream big and continue to advocate for positive change for our tamariki.

Ngā mihi,

Liam Rutherford  
National President/Te Manukura  
NZEI Te Riu Roa

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